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Huggins Attic

Large Green Honing Compound Block for most edge tools

Large Green Honing Compound Block for most edge tools

Regular price £10.99 GBP
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Large Green Honing Compound Block

This is not a toy and is not intended for small children. Adult supervision is highly recommended for children and expert advice for the bigger kids!

These compound honing blocks serves well for stropping most edge tools, in the workshop, in the great outdoors or at home. They will help keep your knife or tool razor-sharp for a lot longer before it needs re-sharpening.

These blocks are meant to be used and are not really intended for display, so you can expect a workman like finish.

PLEASE NOTE THE BLOCKS DO VARY SLIGHTLY

Features:

  • Good for honing or polishing
  • Use in the workshop or in the field
  • Can be be cut into a smaller piece for easier carrying in the field

Specifications (All measurements are approximate):

  • Long 110mm
  • Wide 36mm
  • High 24mm
  • Weighs 106g

The basic idea behind honing, or stropping is to remove the burr, on any cutting edge, that remains after sharpening. Honing also polishes the cutting edge on a microscopic level and leaves an edge sharper and stronger. If you wish you can use a honing paste, or compound, on one side of the block to speed up the process, as the paste is mildly abrasive. Knives for example should be held at an angle of about 20 degrees to the surface whilst being swept along the surface. Other tools such as chisels may be best honed using a jig to hold them at the correct angle for the tool.

Honing

Honing can be used to sharpen a blade by removing small amounts of material from the blade's edge to create a sharp, precise cutting edge. Honing a blade involves running the blade along an abrasive surface, such as a sharpening stone, in a controlled manner to remove any dull or damaged areas from the edge of the blade.

The honing process typically involves several steps, with increasingly fine abrasives used in each step to achieve a sharp, polished edge. Coarse abrasives are used first to remove any major nicks or chips in the blade, and then finer abrasives are used to refine the edge to a razor-sharp finish.

To hone a blade, the blade is held at a consistent angle against the abrasive surface and moved back and forth in a controlled manner. This process is repeated several times, with the angle and pressure adjusted as needed to achieve the desired sharpness.

Honing is a relatively gentle process compared to grinding, which removes more material and can create more heat, potentially damaging the blade. Honing is also effective for maintaining a sharp edge on a blade that is already relatively sharp, whereas grinding may be necessary to reshape a blade that has become badly worn or damaged.

Honing compound

Honing compound, also known as stropping compound or polishing compound, is a fine abrasive paste or powder that is used in the honing process to achieve a smooth, polished finish on a work piece or blade. Honing compounds come in different grits or abrasive sizes, from coarse to fine, and are typically made from a blend of abrasive particles, such as aluminium oxide, silicon carbide, or diamond, mixed with a binder, such as wax or oil.

When used with a honing stone or leather strop, honing compound helps to refine the edge of a blade or work piece by removing small amounts of material and creating a smooth, polished surface. The abrasive particles in the honing compound break down gradually during use, which helps to prevent the compound from becoming clogged with metal particles and losing its effectiveness.

Honing compound is available in different colours, which indicate the size of the abrasive particles and the level of fineness. For example, a green honing compound may have a finer abrasive than a red compound. It is important to choose the right honing compound for the job, depending on the level of sharpness and finish desired.

Here is a general guide to the colour codes used by many manufacturers:

  • White: This is the finest honing compound available, with a particle size of around 0.5 microns. It is used for final polishing and honing to achieve an extremely sharp, mirror-like edge.
  • Yellow: This is a very fine honing compound, with a particle size of around 1 micron. It is used for final polishing and honing to achieve a razor-sharp edge.
  • Green: This is a fine honing compound, with a particle size of around 2 microns. It is used for honing and refining the edge of a blade or tool to achieve a sharp, polished finish.
  • Blue: This is a medium-fine honing compound, with a particle size of around 6 microns. It is used for honing and refining the edge of a blade or tool to achieve a sharp, polished finish.
  • Red: This is a coarse honing compound, with a particle size of around 15 microns. It is used for removing nicks and chips from the edge of a blade or tool, and for initial honing.
  • Black: This is an ultra-coarse honing compound, with a particle size of around 30 microns. It is used for removing deep scratches and defects from the edge of a blade or tool, and for initial honing on very dull or damaged edges.

The choice of honing compound depends on the type of blade, the level of sharpness and finish desired, and the material being honed. Here are some general guidelines for selecting honing compounds for different types of blades:

  • Straight razors and knives: For straight razors and knives, a fine honing compound such as white, yellow, or green is typically used to achieve a sharp, polished edge. Straight razors may require a slightly finer honing compound than knives, as they need to be sharpened to an extremely fine edge.
  • Chisels and plane blades: For chisels and plane blades, a medium-fine honing compound such as blue or green is typically used to achieve a sharp, polished edge. Coarser honing compounds such as red or black may be used for removing nicks and chips from the edge but should be followed by a finer compound to achieve a sharp, polished finish.
  • Axes and machetes: For axes and machetes, a coarse honing compound such as red or black is typically used to remove nicks and chips from the edge. A medium-fine compound such as blue may be used to refine the edge and achieve a sharp, polished finish.
  • Scissors and shears: For scissors and shears, a fine honing compound such as white or yellow is typically used to achieve a sharp, polished edge. Coarser compounds may be used for removing nicks and chips, but care should be taken to maintain the correct angle of the bevel to avoid damaging the blade.

It is important to choose the right honing compound for the job and to follow the manufacturer's instructions for use to achieve the best results.

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